Reader Questions

I thought that now that my kids were back in school I’d have all kinds of time to post here – but somehow between being PTA president, starting a PTO at my youngest’s preschool, getting involved in local politics, reading a bunch of books and starting to lift weights again (because I was feeling weak NOT for body sculpting purposes), and yes, getting a little mired in the national election coverage too… not so much. But hopefully this will start a new routine!

I asked in my facebook group for questions people would like answered. If you have anything else you’d like me to address, pop it in the comments and I will do so on another post!

1. What do you think about soy and other estrogen increasing foods?

Many people think that the issue when one has HA is low estrogen. This is not the case. The issue is that your hypothalamus is not sending the signals to your reproductive system. Once your hypothalamus turns back on again, your estrogen will rise appropriately. So as far as foods go – I advocate moderation on all fronts. It’s fine to eat some soy but I see no need to specifically increase the amount you’re currently eating. If you’re eating a “lot,” I’d advocate cutting down and substituting with other protein and fat sources simply in the interests of eating as many different types of foods as possible.

2. Does color and length of your period indicate anything?

This one actually comes up a lot! Many women are afraid that their period is “too light” when they start cycling again. My ‘normal’ post pregnancy has been one heavy day (which I define as filling a regular tampon every 2-4 hours), a medium day (filling a tampon every 6 hours or so), two light days (a tampon every ~12 hours) and then a day or two of spotting. Something around that seems to be reasonably common. Some women obviously have much heavier periods, some have significantly lighter periods – but anecdotally I haven’t noticed a correlation with ease of getting pregnant. Also, interestingly, it seems that not all the lining is shed as “blood” but some can actually be resorbed into the uterus. So I think that really what is important is what is normal for you. If your periods after recovery are much lighter than before, that may indicate a need to relax a little further on the exercise, eat a bit more, or see what you can do about relaxing (all of which we cover in our book :)). If they’re much heavier, you may want to check in with your doctor, just in case there is another issue at play like endometriosis. If they’re normal for you, however heavy or long that may be – chances are excellent that everything is fine. If you are trying to conceive and not getting pregnant, you can discuss with your doctor, but barring that – go with the flow. (yes, pun intended ;))

3. How long will it take to recover?

In a previous post I discussed whether time to recovery was associated with length of time without a period, and the answer in that case seems to be no. The median time to recover is about six months – some shorter, some longer. In general, the more quickly you are able to go “all in” the more quickly you will recover your cycles. I wish there was a formula I could plug your information into that would spit out an answer – but unfortunately life doesn’t work like that. Your particular recovery formula will depend on what your BMI was/is and how quickly you’re able to increase that to a ‘fertile’ BMI of 22+, how much exercise you did and what you’re doing now, what your food intake looks like (hint: the more variety the better, assuming sufficient energy), and what your daily stress and anxiety levels are (and unfortunately this is a vicious circle because stressing out over how long it will take to recover can make it take longer!).

4. I can’t go all in. I don’t trust the process.

From my experience what really helps here is seeing other women recover. (Read the success stories in our book and join my facebook group!) When you find someone just like you and read about what they did to restore cycles or get pregnant, it makes it that much easier to believe that it can and will happen for you. Keep reading the successes, keep listening to the other amazing resources that are out there (I cannot recommend Meret Boxler’s podcasts enough, she will introduce you to everyone you need to know in this arena), do as much as you can to work toward recovery (fake it ’til you make it) and one day it will click for you too. I have seen it countless times. It will come.

5. How do you track food while in recovery and know you’re eating enough?

This is a tough one because really, tracking is a big part of the problem. So it’s hard to see it as part of the solution too – but I know that when you’re starting on this path from a place where you are tracking it is hard to let that go. What I did initially was to increase the amount of calories I was allowing myself each day (“allowing”…that’s a whole different topic) and I continued meticulously tracking as I had been. I’m a numbers person so that was hard for me to let go. But there came a time when I’d skip a day… and that quickly grew to two and three and then to not tracking at all anymore. At that point I had a good sense of how much I needed to eat each day and I was much better at listening to my hunger signals. If you’re not tracking now I wouldn’t suggest starting unless *maybe* you log your food intake for a day just to see where you’re at. Really the best way to know you’re eating enough is two-fold: 1) if you’re under a fertile BMI to make sure you are gaining, and 2) notice your fertile signs (chapter 16) and obviously return of your period. And yes you often have to go beyond what feels comfortable for you, both in the amount you’re eating and in how much weight you gain… but I *promise* you, the return of your cycles and your fertility is worth that discomfort. Again – seek out success stories and read about how little women care about what their body looks like when they see that first sign of red, or get their positive pregnancy test.

6. If a period was lost with no exercise, will adding exercise while eating more calories, fat, carbs delay recovery?

Abso-freaking-lutely yes. I was over in a different facebook group today and a women commented on how she had just started a new exercise routine, going five days a week instead of the one she had been doing, and how her ovulation was six days late (and still nowhere to be seen). Especially if your body isn’t accustomed to it, the increased cortisol from exercise can do a number on your hypothalamus. Walking and yoga, *light intensity* are probably okay but I would add even those slowly. Also, I noticed a big effect of exercise on my own cycles (p. 162 in our book) even while gaining weight.

I hope you found this helpful, and if there’s anything else you’d like to know, drop a comment!

Embracing the New You

I just went to see the movie Embrace with my new friend and fellow HA warrior Kate. It was lovely meeting her in person and we spent a lot of time over dinner before the show bemoaning how our society has encouraged us toward the predicament of treating our bodies so harshly in an attempt to be healthy – and also how much more common hypothalamic amenorrhea is these days with the latest trends in “clean” eating and strength and endurance training for women.

embrace_showing

Anyway, the movie was utterly fantastic and I cannot recommend it enough. Whatever your personal situation is, I can pretty much guarantee that Embrace will speak to you. I love the idea that is becoming more and more commonplace: that we should love ourselves and others for what we accomplish and *think* instead of what we look like (and heck, let’s do our best to pass this idea on to the next generation!). I know, not really a newsflash anymore, but at the same time it’s an idea that is easy to give lipservice to without truly believing. Embrace took me even further than I was down the path of believing. Find a way to see this movie! #ihaveembraced

Along the lines of switching your outlook, a woman recently posted in a facebook support group of which I am a member (join mine here) about how she was struggling with feeling frumpy and not hot when she went into a fashionable store to try on some new clothes. The responses were amazing, insightful, and inspiring, which is why you should join too if you’re working on recovery. Who doesn’t need an army of HA warriors at their back?

Lindsay said, “I’m so sorry you’re having a rough day. I understand; I had MANY of them. The next time you go shopping and you don’t like how something looks when you try it on, try to shift your mindset from “This fabulous shirt doesn’t fit my body” to “My fabulous body doesn’t fit this shirt“. There is nothing wrong with your body; it’s the shirt that doesn’t work. Take it off, and try on a different style. Do you remember the show What Not to Wear? I like to think of that show every time I go shopping, because Stacy and Clinton could always make ANY person look fabulous, no matter how big/small/short/tall. It’s just a matter of finding clothing that really flatters you. Body love and acceptance takes time… you’re just getting started here, and the changes are fresh and new. Over time, you’ll get used to your new self, and you will grow to love it as much as you did your old self. Maybe even more. Remind yourself daily that you are a multi-dimensional person… you are not just a body. And truly, the other aspects of your being – your personality, your sense of humor, your wit, your charm – are what people are most drawn to. Don’t let any perceived ‘imperfections’ of your physical body spoil the rest of that.”

Yes, yes, YES!

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